Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

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Photo Credit: En Foco

“Carrie Mae Weems is a socially motivated artist whose works invite contemplation of race, gender, and class. Increasingly, she has broadened her view to include global struggles for equality and justice. Comprehensive in scope, this retrospective primarily features photographs, including the groundbreaking Kitchen Table Series (1990), but also presents written texts, audio recordings, and videos. The exhibition traces the evolution of Weems’s career over the last 30 years, from her early documentary and autobiographical photographic series to the more conceptual and philosophically complex works that have placed her at the forefront of contemporary art.”

Continue reading @ Guggenheim.Org

Writing Black Feminism

ImageThis week a list has gone viral on Facebook, at least among several of my friends. The readers among us have been exchanging 9, 10, or even 20 novels or essays that have moved us in some way. Of course for a literature professor, condensing valuable texts to a concise list is nearly impossible. But in the spirit of year-end list making, here are 10 Black Feminist Novels that have stayed with me (in no particular order):

1. Toni Morrison’s Sula

2. Nella Larsen’s Passing

3. Audre Lorde’s Zami

4. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun

5. Ann Petry’s The Street

6. Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions

7. Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (not a novel, but …)

8. Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy

9. Alice Walker’s Meridian

10. Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who’ve considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf

What black feminist works continue to inspire you?